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Maryland Theft Attorney

Theft crimes in Maryland cover a wide variety of offenses, from shoplifting to fraud. Conviction for a theft crime often results in serious penalties, including incarceration and large fines. It is extremely important to have an experienced Maryland theft lawyer on your side who can protect your rights and work to minimize the impact of the charges you are facing. A lawyer in Maryland who is knowledgeable about theft cases can explain your options so you can make an informed decision on your next step.

How A Maryland Theft Lawyer Can Help

Theft charges in Maryland must be taken seriously. With the help of an aggressive Maryland theft lawyer, you can fight to preserve your rights and reputation in court. A Maryland theft lawyer knows that being accused of taking money or property from another person can be difficult. That’s why we give each case the time and dedication it requires to help our clients achieve a positive outcome.

There is no way to ensure a positive outcome in any legal matter, but taking the time to protect yourself with excellent counsel is a step in the right direction. Contact our responsive team to set up your free initial consultation.

Theft Charges in Maryland

Theft can include crimes such as:

  • Theft by deception (embezzlement and fraud) (Section 7-104(b))
  • Possession of stolen property (Section 7-104(c))
  • Fails to return property known to be lost, misplaced, or wrongfully delivered (Section 7-104(d))
  • Theft of services (Section 7-104(e))

Maryland Criminal Code Section 7-104 explains that theft is any sort of “unauthorized control over property.” In other words, it is illegal to assert your own control over any sort of tangible or intangible good or service that rightfully belongs to another person.

Crimes such as shoplifting, writing bad checks, identity theft, and credit card fraud fall under the broader section defining theft by deception (Service 7-104(b)).

It is worth noting that, in a given case, there may be some question as to whether a person rightfully owns a certain item or service, or whether they were actually deprived of it at all.  These are the elements of your case a Maryland theft lawyer will seek to investigate with the purpose of designing a strong defense in your favor.

Penalties for Theft in Maryland

The penalties for theft depend on the value of the property or services stolen and on whether the defendant has prior convictions for theft (Section 7-104(g)). As a a Maryland theft lawyer can tell you, no matter what the value of the goods or services taken, anyone convicted of a theft crime must compensate the rightful owner the exact value of the property in question, which means restoring it to their custody or paying for its value.

Felony Thefts

Enhanced penalties for certain crimes:

  • Motor vehicle theft (Section 7-105)
  • Bad checks (Section 7-107)
  • Robbery (Sections 3-402; 3-403; 3-405)
  • Carjacking (Section 3-405(b)(1))

Theft of property or services valued between $1,000 and $10,000 is a felony, conviction for which can result in up to 10 years in prison and/or up to a $10,000 fine.

Theft of property or services valued between $10,000 and $100,000 is a felony, conviction for which can result in up to 15 years in prison and/or up to a $15,000 fine.

Theft of property or services valued over $100,000 is a felony, conviction for which can result in up to 25 years in prison and/or up to a $25,000 fine.

Misdemeanor Thefts

Theft of property or services valued more than $100 but less than $1,000 is a misdemeanor, conviction for which can result in up to 18 months and/or up to a $500 fine.

Theft of property or services valued under $100 is a misdemeanor, conviction for which can result in up to 90 days in jail and/or up to a $500 fine.

Enhanced penalties for third and subsequent offenses

It is even more imperative that you contact a Maryland theft lawyer if you already have a criminal record as anyone who has been convicted a total of three times of theft under $1,000 can be fined up to $5,000 and may be forced to serve a five-year prison term.